TGOC2018 – A photo a day – Day 11 – Muck

This year I’m going to write a blog post for each day of my TGO Challenge crossing and base the post on one photograph from that day. The photo won’t necessarily be the most stunning scenery but will be something that triggers memories for me.
Day 11 – Tuesday 22nd May 2018

If you’ve read this far you’re probably wondering just how bad today is going to be. I mean, you’re probably picking up on the fact that I was having a pretty tough time on this year’s TGO Challenge. I admit that I wasn’t skipping along gaily but my cold had all but gone and my perseverance on the really tough days had reminded me that I CAN DO THIS, so my mood was much improved. Light drizzle all day kept me in my waterproof trousers but I was pleased to walk 30km in just over 8 hours with a break for a cheese wrap in St Margaret’s churchyard in Forgue.

The photograph shows farmland and a pile of steaming / smoking (?) cow muck. I was wondering if it had been set alight or does it generate enough heat by itself to start smoking? Over the next couple of days, I saw several tractors pulling wagons of steaming poo. Where do they take it? Were they moving it away from where they didn’t want it? Or to somewhere where there is a market for it? These are the important questions which fill my mind on a long distance walk.

Whenever I see a pile of manure it reminds me of the last camp on my second TGO Challenge in 2007 when I asked a farmer if I could pitch in the corner of his field right next to a huge pile of dung. He said yes.

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4 Responses to TGOC2018 – A photo a day – Day 11 – Muck

  1. louse4 says:

    Farmer with a sense of humour there 😂😂😂
    It’s generally steam, manure generates a lot of heat, but in certain conditions it can spontaneously combust. The farmers are moving it to control this, smaller piles are better (😂😂😂) and also to enable distribution when it has rotted down enough to be spread and ploughed in. I think.

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  2. John Jocys says:

    What a kind farmer 😁
    An equally kind farmer, who’s farm was on the LDWA100 route a couple of years ago, thought it was a wheeze to block access to a stile with the biggest and most fragrant (not!) mountain of cow poo I’ve ever seen. It was so big that had the Pieman been aware of it he would have added it to his list of tops to climb.

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  3. Ian says:

    When I saw the title of this post Judith, I thought you’d taken the coast-to-coast thing toa westerly extreme!

    The muck was probably being moved to be spread just prior to turning the ground, at least that’s the usual practice near to me. When it’s being stockpiled through the winter there are new geographical features around the place!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. AlanR says:

    Louise is spot on.

    Like

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